A bit of sport…

There is really nothing like the bond you feel with your team mates during time spent together. On the bus, during the pickup games. They become your brothers, your kin, and a unique kin it is. You don’t necessarily get along with all of them all the time, but it all works out. There’s nothing more capable of uniting a group of people than a common goal and a yearning to achieve that goal. A yearning that roots itself deep within you, and from the practice field to the game pitch that yearning pushes all of you to be better, to improve, and to reach for something previously considered in unreachable.

visualizingmath
allofthemath:

strictlyfromdullville:

So, I’ve been wracking my brain for a while for a math-thingy to post about. So I figured I’d go back to the well and find the first math-thingy that I really was interested in.  I don’t know about you, but when I was in 5th grade, my math class had a big section on geometry, where we did basic geometric constructions, and learned like what a diagonal is.  And my teacher showed us that if you wanted to make a star, you could just connect the points of a regular polygon skipping a set number of points. Which I loved.  I have entire notebooks where every page has an octagon or a nonagon or a septagon with the diagonals filled in. They weren’t perfectly constructed and were often irregular, but I realized that every time, they would make a smaller copy of the outer polygon on the inside. 
The term for these constructions, I would find out years later, were star polygons.  The one above is classified as {100/47} which means that there are 100 vertices, and each line segment is connecting the vertex that is 47 points away.  If you could zoom all the way in, you’d see that in the center, its not a perfect circle, but actually another 100-gon. 
I’ve no idea if there’s any practical application to these bad boys, but I always thought they looked really pretty.  Straight lines forming curves, all the intersections, the symmetries, like they’re just aesthetically pleasing to me. 
You should also see how cool polygons look when they have all their diagonals drawn in. 

Oh, so beautiful. These also make wonderful doodle games!

allofthemath:

strictlyfromdullville:

So, I’ve been wracking my brain for a while for a math-thingy to post about. So I figured I’d go back to the well and find the first math-thingy that I really was interested in.  I don’t know about you, but when I was in 5th grade, my math class had a big section on geometry, where we did basic geometric constructions, and learned like what a diagonal is.  And my teacher showed us that if you wanted to make a star, you could just connect the points of a regular polygon skipping a set number of points. Which I loved.  I have entire notebooks where every page has an octagon or a nonagon or a septagon with the diagonals filled in. They weren’t perfectly constructed and were often irregular, but I realized that every time, they would make a smaller copy of the outer polygon on the inside. 

The term for these constructions, I would find out years later, were star polygons.  The one above is classified as {100/47} which means that there are 100 vertices, and each line segment is connecting the vertex that is 47 points away.  If you could zoom all the way in, you’d see that in the center, its not a perfect circle, but actually another 100-gon. 

I’ve no idea if there’s any practical application to these bad boys, but I always thought they looked really pretty.  Straight lines forming curves, all the intersections, the symmetries, like they’re just aesthetically pleasing to me. 

You should also see how cool polygons look when they have all their diagonals drawn in. 

Oh, so beautiful. These also make wonderful doodle games!